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Summer Fire Safety Tips


Grills and Campfires

Every year Americans look forward to summer vacations, camping, family reunions, picnics, and the Fourth of July. Summertime, however, also brings fires and injuries due to outdoor cooking and recreational fires. Annually, there are almost 3,800 Americans injured by gas or charcoal grill fires.

Summertime should be a time of fun and making happy memories. Knowing a few fire safety tips and following safety instructions will help everyone have a safe summer.

Residential Grill Fire Facts

  • An estimated 5,700 grill fires occur on residential properties each year in the United States.

  • Almost half (49 percent) of grill fires on residential properties occur from 5 to 8 p.m.

  • Over half (57 percent) of grill fires on residential properties occur in the 4 months of May, June, July, and August.

  • Thirty-two percent of grill fires on residential properties start on patios, terraces, screened-in porches, or courtyards.

    Grill Safety

  • Propane and charcoal BBQ grills must only be used outdoors. If used indoors, or in any enclosed spaces such as tents, they pose both a fire hazard and the risk of exposing occupants to toxic gases and potential asphyxiation.

  • Position the grill well away from siding, deck railing, and out from under eaves and overhanging branches.

  • Place the grill a safe distance from lawn games, play areas, and foot traffic.

  • Keep children and pets from the grill area: declare a three-foot "safe zone" around the grill.

  • Put out several long-handled grilling tools to give the chef plenty of clearance from heat and flames when cooking.

  • Periodically remove grease or fat buildup in trays below the grill so it cannot be ignited by a hot grill.

    Charcoal Grills

  • Purchase the proper starter fluid and store out of reach of children and away from heat sources.

  • Never add charcoal starter fluid when coals or kindling have already been ignited, and never use any flammable or combustible liquid other than charcoal starter fluid to get the fire going.

    Propane Grills

  • Check the propane cylinder hose for leaks before using it for the first time each year. A light soap and water solution applied to the hose will reveal escaping propane quickly by releasing bubbles.

  • If you determined your grill has a gas leak by smell or the soapy bubble test and there is no flame:

1.      Turn off the propane tank and grill.

2.      If the leak stops, get the grill serviced by a professional before using it again.

3.      If the leak does not stop, call the fire department.

  • If you smell gas while cooking, immediately get away from the grill and call the fire department. Do not attempt to move the grill.

  • All propane cylinders manufactured after April 2002 must have overfill protection devices (OPD). OPDs shut off the flow of propane before capacity is reached, limiting the potential for release of propane gas if the cylinder heats up. OPDs are easily identified by their triangular-shaped hand wheel.

  • Use only equipment bearing the mark of an independent testing laboratory. Follow the manufacturers' instructions on how to set up the grill and maintain it.

  • Never store propane cylinders in buildings or garages. If you store a gas grill inside during the winter, disconnect the cylinder and leave it outside.

    First Aid for Burns

    For minor burns, take the following action:

  • Cool the burn. Hold the burned area under cool (not cold) running water for 10 or 15 minutes or until the pain subsides. If this is impractical, immerse the burn in cool water or cool it with cold compresses. Cooling the burn reduces swelling by conducting heat away from the skin. Don't put ice on the burn.

  • Cover the burn with a sterile gauze bandage. Don't use fluffy cotton, or other material that may get lint in the wound. Wrap the gauze loosely to avoid putting pressure on burned skin. Bandaging keeps air off the burn reduces pain and protects blistered skin.

  • Take an over-the-counter pain reliever. These include aspirin, ibuprofen, naproxen or acetaminophen. Use caution when giving aspirin to children or teenagers. Though aspirin is approved for use in children older than 2, children and teenagers recovering from chickenpox or flu-like symptoms should never take aspirin.

    Talk to a doctor if you have concerns.



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